Tag Archives: charlie brooks

Two or Three Nymph Rig Systems

Two or Three Nymph Rig Systems Blog- Murray’s Fly Shop

Charlie Brooks of West Yellowstone got me into fishing two or three nymph rig systems many years ago. These flies can easily become twisted with the regular casts so I cast these with a slow wide loop. Another method is to make your back cast low to the side. Then turn your wrist and make your forward cast in a higher plane. In low and out high.

My Favorite Smallmouth Bass Fly, Murray’s Heavy Hellgrammite


My Favorite Smallmouth Bass Fly, Murray’s Heavy Hellgrammite

It took me many years to develop my Murray’s Heavy Lead-Eye Hellgrammite. However, with the help of good friend like Charlie Brooks and Ron Kommer, this exceptionally effective pattern evolved.
This effectively duplicates the natural swimming action of the real hellgrammite. This fly can be successfully fished either upstream, downstream or across stream.
The students in my “On The Stream” Smallmouth Bass Schools catch most of their large bass on the Murray’s Heavy Lead-Eye Hellgrammite.

Fly Fishing Podcast for December 2016

Charlie Brooks with Harry Murray
Charlie Brooks taught Harry Murray a great deal about trout fishing on the big western rivers.

In m December Fly Fishing Podcast I am going to discuss the trout fishing and the bass fishing that we can expect to see over the next month and the best tactics to use.

December can provide some excellent fly fishing for large browns and rainbows in large trout streams all across the country.  In order to take advantage of this great action my friend Charlie encouraged using a two or three nymph rig fished along the stream bottom in the areas where the stream bottom was covered with many basketball size stones.  I still use this method today along with my Swing Nymphing Method when fishing in smaller trout streams.  The most effective flies that I discuss in the fly fishing podcast for trout include: Murray’s Roadkill Nymph, Black size 6 & 8, Casual Dress Nymph size 6 & 8, Murray’s Strymph, Olive size 4 & 8, Bitch Creek Nymph size 6 & 8, Mr. Rapidan Bead Head Nymph size 14, Murray’s Dark Stonefly Nymph size 12, Murray’s Caddis Larva size 14, and Murray’s Yellow Stonefly Nymph size 14

Since the bass fishing has slowed down I want to discuss an effective approach for developing and tying your own bass flies that will help you catch more bass in your own waters. A logical starting point is to consider the areas you fish and look at the specific flies you fish in each situation and are these flies productive or not.  I will be discussing my Murray’s Hellgrammite, Strymph, Magnum Streamer Series, and Floating Minnows.

Workshop on Fly Tying
If you are interested in tying your own flies, then consider taking one of my fly fishing workshops.

My next fly tying class will be on Saturday, January 14 from 10a.m. to noon at Murray’s Fly Shop.
For more information visit our website or stop by my fly shop at
121 S. Main St, Edinburg VA 22824    Ph 540-984-4212

Murray’s Strymph

Murray's Olive Strymph Smallmouth Bass Trout Fly Fishing Murray's Fly Shop VA
By carefully designing the Murray’s Strymph, Harry Murray was able to produce a fly that would pass for both a streamer and a nymph.

There are days when the smallmouth bass feed heavily on minnows and fishing streamers catches these fish. However, there are days when they feed mostly on natural nymphs and we catch these smallmouth bass on “artificial nymphs”. Realizing this, I decided to develop one fly to be fished as a Streamer to catch the minnow feeders as well as matching the natural nymphs which could be fished as a Nymph. I developed the Strymph drawing on Ron Kommer’s idea of using ostrich herl in the tail and Charlie Brooks concept of tying underwater flies “in the round”.
Thus the Strymph can be fished upstream dead drift and across the current in a swing nymphing method both of which match our natural nymphs.
The Strymph can easily be fished across stream with a deep swimming action which matches all of our minnows. Simply stated, there is no wrong way to fish the Murray’s Strymph, and it is equally effective for both smallmouth bass and trout.
If you are interested in learning how to tie the Murray’s Strymph, here is the tying kit or you can just purchase the tying instructions recipe sheet.

Clothing

Before the regular anglers around West Yellowstone got to know Charlie Brooks they called him Mr. Monotone. Brook’s, who was a very special friend told me one day when we were fishing the Madison that he finally figured out the name came from the camouflaged clothing he wore most of the time. Since Brook’s fished every day when he first moved to West Yellowstone, he was either on his way to the stream or on his way back when people saw him. Since Brooks was one of the most capable anglers I have ever known, I fully respect his desire to wear subdued colored clothing when fishing. To this day I always wear subdued colored clothing.
I really do believe this helps catch wary fish. For example, I was shocked the day a supposed well-traveled angler showed up for a bass float trip wearing a white t-shirt and white hat and insisted on standing up in the front of our Hyde Drift Boat to fish all day…nope, he caught no large fish.

Sharp Hooks but not too big

If you tie your own nymphs and streamers take a lesson from the late Charlie Brooks as I did many years ago. The previous fall Brooks, while we were fishing the Madison River, stressed the need for large stonefly nymph patterns for the large brown trout on the large rivers. He liked size 4 nymphs on 3X long hooks that were well weighted. That winter I experimented with tying some and sent them out to Brooks. In order to add extra weight to these large nymphs I tied them on 5X stout hooks. Brooks wrote me a very nice thank you letter and liked the style of my stoneflies. However, he pointed out that with wire that large in diameter we would have trouble hooking the trout so I tied some of the same patterns on Mustad 9672 hooks which is a standard weight wire and Brooks did well with them the next summer.