Tag Archives: dry fly fishing

Murray’s Liquid Dry Fly Floatant

Murray's 4 ounce Liquid Dry Fly Floatant.
Murray’s 4 ounce Liquid Dry Fly Floatant.
Murray's 1 ounce Liquid Dry Fly Floatant
Murray’s 1 ounce Liquid Dry Fly Floatant
Murray's Dry Fly Floatant with Holder.
Murray’s Dry Fly Floatant with Holder.

I make this in my fly shop with special ingredients in order to achieve the three most important functions I believe we need in a dry fly floatant. This cleans, drys and waterproofs a dry fly all in one step.
Some anglers soak the dry flies they plan to use in this solution for ten minutes a day or two before they are going fishing in order to build a semi-waterproof coating on each fly.

Murray’s Pop Strike

Wild Brook Trout Fly Fishing Murray's Fly Shop VA
This wild brook trout was just released with a pop strike ad he is headed back home.

When the dry fly fishing is fast and I am catching many cutthroats in the mountain trout streams in the Rockies or brook trout in the Eastern mountain streams, my goal is to raise and hook many trout and then release them as quickly as I can so I do not stress them. My Pop Strike consists of setting the hook on the strike so I know I have fooled him, then two or three seconds later I release all of the tension on the fly line.  This enables more than half of my trout to swim freely away.

Wood Duck Flank

Lemon Woodduck Plumage Fly Tying Murray's Fly Shop Virginia
Lemon Woodduck Plumage

This is part one of three parts on dry fly winging material.  The woodduck flank feathers you see here are one of my favorite materials for tying delicate dry fly wing. They are easy to use and many of the students in my fly tying classes use these to tie great drys on their first attempt. I have friends who use these on the Quill Gordon Dry Fly, March Brown Dry Fly, Light Cahill Dry Fly and many other patterns.

Calf Tail

Calf (Kip) Tail
Calf (Kip) Tail

Calf (Kip) Tail is a very useful material with many applications in tying dry flies, streamers and bass bugs. The yellow calf tail I show here is what I use to tie the wings of the Mr. Rapidan Dry Fly series.  The space between the two pencil-pointers gives us the hair which is easiest to make nice even dry fly wings. I hold these hair fibers by the tips and brush out the short, useless hair and the fuzz with an old tooth brush. Usually these hair fibers are even enough to tie in as they  are producing nice straight wings. If you like you can straighten these hair fibers in a hair evener, but I seldom find this necessary.  The long hair fibers on the tip of the tail make excellent streamers, bass bug tails and even sometimes wings for Trude dry flies. These come in many dyed colors and are inexpensive. The more you experiment with these in your fly tying , the more great uses you will find for them.

Find the Good Water

Mountain Trout Fly Fishing Murray's Fly Shop Virginia
Blue Ridge Mountains
Mountain Trout Fly Fishing Murray's Fly Shop VA
I have often gotten excellent fishing on the mountain streams in the Rockies by hoking into the remote headwaters.

Late last summer I drove a long distance to fish a mountain trout stream.  When I arrived at the lower end of the stream, I was surprised to find it was very discolored as a result of recent rains. Checking my topographic maps I noticed that two substantial feeder streams entered my stream just a mile upstream. By hiking up the trail beside the main stream until I got upstream of the two feeder streams, I found clear water and had outstanding fishing.
On a different trip to a different stream the high stream level forced me to hike several miles upstream to where a nice little feeder brook entered the main stream. I had never fished this little feeder brook before, but that day I had one of the finest days of dry fly fishing I have ever experienced.  Often you are rewarded with outstanding fishing after a short hike.

Winter Workshop: Exploring the Fine Points of Dry Fly Fishing for Trout

Baetis - Pseudo's - BWO's
Dry Fly Fishing Nirvana!

Do you like catching Trout on #22 Midges or #16 Dry Flies?  Join us December 29, 2012 from 10:00am – Noon at the fly shop for our Winter Workshop: “Exploring the Fine Points of Dry Fly Fishing”.  Harry will discuss topics like: How does treating your tippet with Dry Fly Floatant affect the drift of your fly?  Are their differences between fishing dry flies and fishing dry midges?(Yes)  How do I catch more trout on dry flies?  “Drag Free Drift” – What it means on a large trout stream vs. a small trout stream vs. a spring creek.  Bring your questions, this is sure to improve your dry fly success.
Give us a call 540-984-4212 to sign up or sign up online.

Trick Him

There is some aquatic grass drifting on the stream and even though there is a good hatch on, the large trout before you seems to feed mainly on the duns that are drifting amid the drifting grass. Every time you cast to him your fly lands in the grass. Then for a few seconds he moves over to the edge of the grass and takes three duns. Now is your chance. Quickly cast your fly two feet upstream in that open current and you will probably take him.

Don’t Shoot into the Covey

When your dog goes on point and you put up a covey of quail you seldom hit anything if you blast into the covey. You are much more successful if you pick out a specific bird and aim carefully to drop that one, then go to the second bird. This also holds true if you try casting into a pod of rising trout because you usually get drag before a specific trout sees your fly. A more successful tactic is to pick out a specific trout and present your fly accurately to that fish.

Can You See Your Fly?

There is a good hatch of aquatic insects on the stream and the trout are feeding well upon them. You catch several of these insects and by carefully selecting a dry fly from your box you are confident you have a good match for it. However, fishing this fly to rising trout for half and hour does not bring a single strike. On each of your presentation casts you can clearly distinguish your fly from the naturals around it. Then it dawns on you…if it does not look exactly like the naturals to you, it probably does not look like a natural to the trout. Most likely your fly is too large or the wrong color…Try again.