Tag Archives: Madison River

Good Nymph Fisherman

Good Nymph Fly Fisherman Blog- Murray’s Fly Shop- Edinburg, Virginia

I have a friend who is an especially good nymph fisherman. Whether we are fishing the Madison River for browns or the Blue Ridge Mountains for brook trout, he catches many nice trout.  He does this by fishing nymphs upstream dead drift.
When watching him, I detect a common trait which is a landmark of many serious nymph anglers. That is, at some point in the last half of the drift he sets the hook on the majority of the casts. Does this mean he is getting this many strikes from trout? No, but when he is not getting a strike, he is bumping the streambottom with the nymph.
This tells me that we should all consider fishing out nymphs deeply with a natural drift.

Proper Ferrule Care

Jeff Murray Western Trout Fly Fishing Murray's Fly Shop VA
Keep your ferrules dressed for good fit and longevity.

I was fishing with a good friend on the Madison River when he called from two hundred feet downstream that he needed help. When I got to him he pointed his fly rod at me and exclaimed, “Look”! I could easily see that the top section of his four piece fly rod was missing. He said that when he made his regular forward cast the tip section of his fly rod slipped off, tore the fly off and shot out into the river and he could not catch it.  When I asked him if he ever put ferrule dressing on his ferrules he looked at me with an embarrassed look and answered, “well…no”.
This spring I had a beginning anglers break a new rod in a similar situation.  A good friend of mine recently broke his favorite rod when he jammed its dry ferrule together and broke the rod trying to get it apart. All of these problems could have been prevented if the anglers had regularly applied Murray’s Ferrule Dressing to their ferrules.

Clothing

Before the regular anglers around West Yellowstone got to know Charlie Brooks they called him Mr. Monotone. Brook’s, who was a very special friend told me one day when we were fishing the Madison that he finally figured out the name came from the camouflaged clothing he wore most of the time. Since Brook’s fished every day when he first moved to West Yellowstone, he was either on his way to the stream or on his way back when people saw him. Since Brooks was one of the most capable anglers I have ever known, I fully respect his desire to wear subdued colored clothing when fishing. To this day I always wear subdued colored clothing.
I really do believe this helps catch wary fish. For example, I was shocked the day a supposed well-traveled angler showed up for a bass float trip wearing a white t-shirt and white hat and insisted on standing up in the front of our Hyde Drift Boat to fish all day…nope, he caught no large fish.