Tag Archives: fly line

Twisted Line

Jeff Murray Smallmouth Bass Trout Fly Fishing Murray's Fly Shop VA
A good straight fly line cast better and handles better than a twisted fly line.

You become aware that your fly line is twisted when you are standing in the river casting.  This is easy to fix. Remove the fly from the leader and cast straight downstream forty feet, as the current pulls out all of the slack line strip forty feet more line from the reel and feed it downstream. Allow this to hang tight in the current for ten minutes then crank it back in and the twist will be removed.

New Scientific Anglers Fly Line, Part Three

Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink 30 Clear Fly Line
Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink 30 Clear Fly Line

Part Three Blog on Scientific Anglers New Fly Line

The new Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink 30 Clear Line is an outstanding intermediate fly line in 200 grain for five to seven weight rods, 250 grain for six to eight weight rods, 300 grain to seven to nine weight rods and 350 grain for eight to ten weight rods. The 200 grain line is great for Western Trout Streams and smallmouth bass. I like the 350 grain line at the Outer Banks for blues, stripes and puppy drum, if I hang up too much with my 350 grain Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink 30 Warm Fly Line.
This whole line sinks at 1.25 ips and thus is excellent replacement for the Scientific Anglers Mastery Streamer Express Line, which is on SALE.
I use my Murray’s Fluorocarbon 6 foot Sinking Leaders with this new fly line.

New Scientific Anglers Fly Line, Part Two

Scientific Angler Sonar Sink 30 Warm Fly Line

Part Two Blog on Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink 30 Warm Fly Line

The new Scientific Anglers Sink 30 Warm is an outstanding fast sinking head line.  The thirty foot head sinks at 4.0 to 8.0 ips (sinks four feet to fifteen feet) which has an intermediate running line.  The 200 grain line for five to seven weight rods is great for trout and smallmouth bass. The 350 grain line is excellent for eight to ten weight rods in saltwater. I find the 350 grain line ideal for my saltwater fishing at the Outer Banks. I use my Murry’s Fluorocarbon Sinking 6 foot Leader with these lines.  These lines replace the Teeny 200 and 350 grain sinking head lines.

See our next blog for more information on new Scientific Anglers Lines.

New Scientific Anglers Fly Line

Scientific Anglers Sink Tip III Fly Line Murray's Fly Shop VA
Scientific Anglers Sink Tip III Fly Line

Part One Blog on Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink Tip Fly Line

Scientific Anglers New Sonar Sink Tip 3 Fly Line which sinks at 2.50 to 4.25 inches per second is an excellent fly line for both trout and bass fishing. This enables us to fish nymphs and streamers much deeper than is possible with a floating fly line. Due to the new taper it casts just as smoothly as the weight forward floating fly line. We stock this in all weights from 5 through 8. I use the Murray’s Fluorocarbon Sinking 6 foot Leader on these fly lines. This replaces the Scientific Anglers Sonar Sink Tip III Sinking Tip Fly Line.

Fly Fishing Tip: Selecting a Fly Line

Choosing a Fly Fishing Line

The Correct Way To Mend Fly Line

Fly Fishing Tips: Mending Fly Line
Correct mending will increase the number of fish you catch…just remember to pick up the slack

The correct way to mend fly line:
I mend my fly line frequently when I’m fly fishing for trout, salmon, smallmouth bass and steelhead. If you think of the word correcting rather then mending you’ll have a better understanding of your goal.

Let’s assume you are fishing a streamer across stream and you would like to have it maintain a broadside appearance to the fish as you strip it across stream. However, the current where your line enters the stream is moving much faster than the line 40 feet out where the streamer is swimming. This produces an unnatural fast action on the fly so you lift your rod high in the air and lay the line well upstream with an exaggerated sweeping motion. However, you must pick up the extra line that occurs with this mend because if the strike comes with all this slack line on the water you probably will not be aware of it and you’ll miss the fish. By picking up the excess line with your line hand you will have a tight line on the fly you can quickly feel the strike and set the hook. The correct mend will help you fish drys, nymphs and streamers more effective.

Listen to my fly fishing podcast “Smallmouth Bass Podcast Part IX on Smallmouth Fly Fishing Streamer Tactics” for more information on mending fly line.

Scientific Anglers Frequency Magnum Fly Line Review – Murray’s Fly Shop

The new Scientific Anglers Frequency Boost Magnum Fly Lines have a specialty taper which places extra weight in the forward section of the floating fly line. This presents large and heavy flies very smoothly and loads fast action rods very well.  This is the taper I prefer for our smallmouth bass fly fishing because it turns over the heavy, bulky, wind resistant flies such as Popping Bugs and heavy streamers.  This is an excellent smallmouth or largemouth bass fishing fly line.  Similar taper to the discontinued Scientific Anglers Bass Bug Taper Fly Lines.
These fly lines do not mend or roll cast as well as fly lines with a less aggressive front taper such as the Frequency Boost Fly Line.
Buy now
Sizes: 5-8
Length: 100′
Weight Forward Floating Fly Line
Scientific Anglers Frequency Magnum Taper Fly Lines - Murray's Fly Fishing Shop

Scientific Anglers Frequency Magnum Taper Fly Lines - Murray's Fly Fishing Shop

Selecting a Fly Line

Fly fishing fly line selection Selecting a Fly Line.  Do you know the difference between the hundreds of different fly lines on the market? Why are there so many choices? Do I really need to have dozens of fly lines at my disposal to take up fly fishing?  Does the flyfishing world try to make it difficult to understand fly lines?  No, I don’t know, No and yes (it’s confusing to me as well!!!!).
Every day I have folks asking for help in selecting the right fly line for their flyfishing.  The decisions are mind boggling!  It confuses the majority of us and I have even upon asking the manufacturers, had some long moments of silence and blank stares.  The choices don’t have to be confusing.  In this article I have tried to simplify the selection process, regardless of the manufacturer, for the beginner or the advanced fly fishing angler.  I have compiled a list of the fly lines typically used and summarized them by the tapers (shape and weight) which I use for the various types of fly fishing conditions. Check it out….

Three Bass Fly Lines

Fly fishing at the water temperature we have in October (50’s) using the correct fly line wil help you catch the largest bass.

At this time of the year I make sure I carry three different style fly lines in order to fish my flies at the depth required to catch bass at all depths in which they might feed.

1. I use a floating fly line in order to catch them in shallow water and when they feed on the surface.
2. I use a Scientific Anglers Mastery Sink Tip III Fly Line to fish the fast runs and moderately deep water.
3. I use a Teeny 200 Sinking Head Fly Line in order to fish the deepest pools.

Be ready for strikes flyfishing for Smallmouth Bass


Frequently a large smallmouth bass will strike your fly the second it lands on the river. In order to be able to set the hook quickly on these bass I like to have complete control of the shooting line as the fly line shoots out on the presentation cast.

In order to achieve this I form a O shape loop with my thumb and forefinger on my line hand and allow the fly line to glide through this as the fly sails out to the target. Then when the fly lands on the river I quickly close this loop in the fingers on my line hand. This enables me to have a tight line on the fly and I can instantly set the hook with both the rod and my line hand.

Avoid Catastrophe Switching Spools on your Reel

You are wading in water waist deep and you want to switch from a floating to a sinking tip line. Just remove the spool from your reel and replace it with the spool in your vest which is holding the sinking tip line. The problem is how to safely string up your 9ft. fly rod without wading back to the bank. To achieve this I thread up the lower half of the rod then take the rod apart at the middle ferrule and thread that part and reassemble the rod when I’m finished.

Cleaning and Dressing your Fly Line

This photo essay will cover the steps to clean and dress your fly line to ensure optimum performance.

Step 1
I simply put mild dish soap on a damp towel to clean my fly line.
I apply a small amount of mild dish soap to a damp clean towel.

Step 2

Strip the fly line off of your reel.  Be careful to strip it into an area that is clean and safe from feet.  I like to make 3-4 foot strips and thoroughly inspect the fly line as I am going. I look for nicks in the coating and check my knots for signs of weakness.  I make it a habit of re-tying all of my knots once a year, especially the line/leader knot.

Step 3

Strip the fly line through your soapy towel.  I strip the line through twice.  Once from tip to butt and then from butt to tip.
After cleaning with soapy towel, remove soap by stripping fly line under running water.  Again strip form tip to butt then butt to tip.

Step 4

Dry the fly line thoroughly.

Step 5

Apply about a penny size amount of fly line dressing on your applicator pad or clean, dry towel.

Step 6

Strip the fly line through the applicator pad/ line dressing.  Again work from tip to butt and then from butt to tip. This will help to ensure all of the microscopic nicks and dings are filled with line dressing.

Step 7

Allow the line dressing to dry on the fly line for 5-10 minutes.

Step 8

Remove the excess fly line dressing with a clean soft cloth by stripping the line from butt to tip and then tip to butt.  We are then ready to wind the line back onto the reel.
As the season progresses and you notice that your fly line begins to feel sticky or that it just doesn’t shoot right.  When this happens, follow the steps above to restore the performance of the line. Depending on how dirty your streams or ponds are (i.e. grass, moss, pollen, mud) will dictate how often you should clean and dress your fly line.  We use Scientific Anglers Fly Line Dressing or Glide Line Dressing on our personal and school outfits and have been pleased with the results.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email us (info@murraysflyshop.com) or give us a call at 540-984-4212.

Rigging Your Reel & Fly Line

This photo essay will cover the steps involved in placing a new fly line on your reel.
I already had backing on this reel. If you are starting with a new reel; tie your backing to the arbor (center) of the spool first then wind the backing on under pressure.
Step 1
Step 1 Remove old fly line from reel.
After stripping the old line off the reel, check the backing for mold/mildew or any other undesirable damage like knots and knicks.

Step 2
The tools needed for placing a new fly line on your reel.
You will find a pair of snips and pliers handy when rigging your fly reel/ fly line.

Step 3
Tie an Albright Knot attaching the Backing and Fly Line
Start with an Albright Knot to attach the fly line to the backing.  I cinch my backing down with a pair of pliers. You will notice that the backing cuts into the coating of  the fly line, this is okay since the strength of the fly line is in the core not coating.  This is a very strong knot and is sufficient for all but the largest gamefish (Tarpon, Large Permit) where you will need a Bimini Twist or something like it.

Step 4
Apply UV Knot Sense or Aquaseal to line/ backing connection
This is a personal preference; I like to place Aquaseal or Pliobond on my line/ backing connection to make the connection pull through my guides smoothly. Â This may take more than one application. Â If you are in a hurry, skip this step or use UV Aquaseal.

Step 5
Wind line onto reel under tension.
Wind the fly line onto your reel under constant and steady tension. Â If you are putting backing on your reel for the first time, constant steady and firm tension is very important. Â Should you place the line or backing on under loose tension, you run the risk of the line pulling itself into the line below it as it is being pulled off under pressure (i.e. a big fish pulling against the drag) and creating a tight knot. This knot will surely take more time to untangle than you will have when your fishing is pulling line at 30mph. Â An ounce of prevention…….

Step 6
Make sure you leave space between the line and reel frame.
Once you have all of the fly line on your reel, check to make sure your line is not rubbing the reel frame. Â If you find that it is close or is touching the pillars, strip your line off the reel and remove some backing. Â Then start over with step one.

Step 7
Attaching Leader to Fly Line with Loop to Loop
The loop to loop connections will work with any leader on the market. Â You will need to tie a double surgeons loop or perfection loop in the end of your leader if it does not already have one.

Step  8
Loop To Loop Connection Correctly tied.
Take the time to make sure your Loop to Loop connection looks like this. Â It should look similar to a square knot. Â I cinch it down tight and usually find that this will not slip out under normal fishing conditions. Â If you find yourself in windy conditions, at the end of the day check this connection for wear and to make sure it does not look like the photo below.

Loop To Loop Connection Incorrectly Tied
This is an example of an incorrectly connected Loop to Loop. Â This is a hitch and will allow the leader to cut through itself.
Throughout the season we check these knots several times. Â Normal wear and tear will weaken these knots over one season. Â Re-tie them when they start to show signs of wear or, obviously, if they break when you pull on them firmly. Â Replace your leader at least yearly or more frequently depending on the amount of fishing you do.
Clean and dress your fly line with a line dressing every 30 hours of fishing or more frequently if you are in a dirty environment. Â This will greatly prolong the life of your fly line.

We will have a blog up shortly that will cover the needle knot which is my preferred line – leader connection.

Selecting a Fly Line Video with Harry

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Selecting a Fly Line

Fly fishing fly line selection Selecting a Fly Line. Do you know the difference between the hundreds of different fly lines on the market? Why are there so many choices? Do I really need to have dozens of fly lines at my disposal to take up fly fishing? Does the flyfishing world try to make it difficult to understand fly lines? No, I don’t know, No and yes (it’s confusing to me as well!!!!).
Every day I have folks asking for help in selecting the right fly line for their flyfishing. The decisions are mind boggling! It confuses the majority of us and I have even upon asking the manufacturers, had some long moments of silence and blank stares. The choices don’t have to be confusing. In this article I have tried to simplify the selection process, regardless of the manufacturer, for the beginner or the advanced fly fishing angler. I have compiled a list of the fly lines typically used and summarized them by the tapers (shape and weight) which I use for the various types of fly fishing conditions. Check it out….